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QUINOA(quinua)
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  Quinoa
Spanish: quinua, from Quechua: kinwa, is a grain-like crop grown primarily for its edible seeds. It is a pseudocereal rather than a true cereal, or grain, as it is not a member of the grass family. As a chenopod, quinoa is closely related to species such as beets, spinach, and tumbleweeds. Its leaves are also eaten as a leaf vegetable, much like amaranth, but the commercial availability of quinoa greens is currently limited.
Overview Derived from the Spanish spelling of the Quechua name, kinwa, Quinoa originated in the Andean region of South America, where it was domesticated 3000 to 4000 years ago for human consumption, though archeological evidence shows a non-domesticated association with pastoral herding some 5200 to 7000 years ago.  Quinoa is generally undemanding and altitude-hardy, so it can be easily cultivated over 13,120 ft (4,000 m). Depending on the variety, quinoa's optimal growing conditions are in cool climates with temperatures that range from 25°F/-3°C, during the night, to below 95°F/35°C, during the day, with an annual precipitation of 10-15 inches (26–38 cm). Quinoa does best in sandy, well-drained soils with a low nutrient content and a soil condition of 4.8 pH (high acidity) to 8.0 pH (alkaline). Yields are maximized when 150 to 180 lbs N/acre are available.
History and culture
The Incas, who held the crop to be sacred, referred to quinoa as chisaya mama or 'mother of all grains', and it was the Inca emperor who would traditionally sow the first seeds of the season using 'golden implements'. During the European conquest of South America quinoa was scorned by the Spanish colonists as 'food for Indians', and even actively suppressed its cultivation, due to its status within indigenous non-Christian ceremonies.  In fact, the conquistadors forbade quinoa cultivation for a time and the Incas were forced to grow wheat instead.
Nutritional value
Quinoa was of great nutritional importance in pre-Columbian Andean civilizations, being secondary only to the potato, and was followed in importance by maize. In contemporary times, this crop has become highly appreciated for its nutritional value, as its protein content is very high (12%–18%). Unlike wheat or rice (which are low in lysine), and like oats, quinoa contains a balanced set of essential amino acids for humans, making it an unusually complete protein source among plant foods.  It is a good source of dietary fiber and phosphorus and is high in magnesium and iron. Quinoa is gluten-free and considered easy to digest. Because of all these characteristics, quinoa is being considered a possible crop in NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System for long-duration manned spaceflights.
Preparation
A spoonful of quinoa Quinoa has a light, fluffy texture when cooked, and its mild, slightly nutty flavor makes it an alternative to white rice or couscous.
The first step in preparing quinoa is to remove the saponins, a process that requires soaking the grain in water for a few hours, then changing the water and resoaking, or rinsing it in ample running water either in a fine strainer or in cheesecloth. Removal of the saponin helps with digestion; the soapy nature of the compound makes it act as a laxative. Most boxed quinoa has been pre-rinsed for convenience.
A common cooking method is to treat quinoa much like rice, bringing two cups of water to a boil with one cup of grain, covering at a low simmer and cooking for 14–18 minutes or until the germ separates from the seed. The cooked germ looks like a tiny curl and should have a slight bite to it (like al dente pasta). As an alternative, one can use a rice cooker to prepare quinoa, treating it just like white rice (for both cooking cycle and water amounts).
Vegetables and seasonings can also be added to make a wide range of dishes. Chicken or vegetable stock can be substituted for water during cooking, adding flavor. It is also suited to vegetable pilafs, complementing bitter greens like kale.
Quinoa can serve as a high-protein breakfast food mixed with honey, almonds, or berries; it is also sold as a dry product, much like corn flakes. Quinoa flour can be used in wheat-based and gluten-free baking.
Quinoa may be germinated in its raw form to boost its nutritional value. Germination activates its natural enzymes and multiplies its vitamin content.   In fact, quinoa has a notably short germination period: Only 2–4 hours resting in a glass of clean water is enough to make it sprout and release gases, as opposed to, e.g., 12 hours with wheat. This process, besides its nutritional enhancements, softens the grains, making them suitable to be added to salads and other cold foods.
quinoa grain
 
quinoa grain
Quinoa plant
 
Quinoa Grain
quinoa
 
red quinoa
Quinoa Food
 
Red Quinoa Food
 

QUINOA REAL, because of its nutritive importance, is one of the main source of PROTEINS with 12.5 a 15%, as average and can be compared with other food such as milk, meat, eggs and others.

QUINOA REAL, characterizes itself, more than the quantity, for the quality of its proteins given by the essential amino acids such as: isoleucine leucine, lysine, metionine, fenilalanine, treonine, triftófane y valine. Concentration of lysine in the protein of the quinoa is almost twice in comparison to the cereals and minerals.

In addition of the B Complex Vitamins, it contains C and E vitamins, tiamine, riboflavine and a high content of minerals such as phosphorus, potassium, magnesium and y calcium among others.

Those who, because of some reasons that cannot have milk and dairy products can find in the quinoa the ideal substitute of calcium.

IT DOES NOT CONTENT CHOLESTEROL,IT DOES NOW ALLOW TO KEEP FAT IN THE BODY, DUE TO THE PRESENCE OF NON-SATURATED OLIC ACIDS IS PRACTICALLY ZERO. IT MAKES DIGESTION EASIE.

 
 
PRODUCTS
 
NAME DESCRIPCTION
Pearly Quinoa: Royal Quinoa in Grain, product for export, it has a pearly color and a big grain of the Royal variety, their use is quite wide; for example for soups, in the breakfast with milk, for bakery, etc.
Quinua in Grain: Quinoa in grain, toast in order to use like rice, it is a excelente garnish for meats
Quinoa Inflated: Quinoa inflated, excellent for a nutritious breakfast, used with milk like corn flake; like goody incorporating you flavors or like nougats; in confectionery like hailed for cakes and ice creams.
Flour: Flour of quinoa for bakery, it increment the nutritious courage of any food; in pastas, breads cookies, etc.
Quicoa: Quinoa processed type trenches, for soups breakfasts, desserts, etc
 
 
NUTRITIONAL COMPOSITION TABLE
COMPOSITION TABLE PER 100gr.
OF A
PEARL QUINOA SAMPLE
COMPONENT
QUANTITY 100%
Protein
13.68%
Fiber
3.58%
Carbohydrates
77.68%
Fat
6.45%
Ash-gray
2.19%
Saponine
0.08%

ENERGETIC VALUE Ocal/ .100

426.96%
 
Quinoa Royal
Aminoacid in g/100g de protein
Protein
11,8
Phenylalanine
4,05
Tryptophan
1,30
Methionine
2,20
Leucine
6,83
Isoleucine
7,05
Valine
3,38
Lysine
7,36
Threonine
4,51
Arginine
6,76
Histidine
2,82
 
 
Percentual comparison of the most important amino-acids of the QUINOA with other grains
AMINOACIDS
QUINOA
RICE
CORN
WHEAT
Lisine
6.80
3.80
2.90
2.90
Metionine
2.10
2.20
2.00
1.50
Treonine
4.50
3.80
3.80
2.90
Triptofane
1.30
1.10
1.10
1.10
Celiac
halal
Haccp
Isso
Kosher
Fairtade
imo
organic
quinua food
 
quinoa flakes
Quinoa Food
 
Quinoa Flakes
red quinoa
 
quinua
Red Quinoa
 
QUINOA'S THE KING OF THE GRAINS 100% ORGANIC
red quinoa
 
Celiac is a digestive disorder in which the small intestine has a toxic reaction to gluten, a protein commonly found in wheat and other grains.
celiac
Treatment consists of a gluten free diet for life, which leads to a full recovery in most cases.
Red Quinoa
 
RECIPES
 
40 vegetarian quinoa recipes
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quinoa
  International Year of the Quinoa (IYQ-2013) LINK
The year 2013 has been declared "The International Year of the Quinoa" (IYQ), recognizing the Andean indigenous peoples, who have maintained, controlled, protected and preserved quinoa as food for present and future generations thanks to their traditional knowledge and practices of living well in harmony with mother earth and nature.
The International Year of the Quinoa (IYQ) was proposed by the government of Bolivia, with support from Argentina, Azerbaijan, Ecuador, Georgia, Honduras, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay, and FAO, and approved by the United Nations General Assembly in December 2011. The Conference took note of the exceptional nutritional qualities of quinoa, its adaptability to different agro-ecological floors and its potential contribution in the fight against hunger and malnutrition.
quinoa
 

Our vision
Quinoa is recognized and accepted around the world as a natural food resource with high nutritive value of Andean origin becoming a high quality food for health and food security, for present and future generations.

Our objective
The objective of the IYQ Plan is to focus world attention on the role that quinoa´s biodiversity and nutritional value plays, in providing food security and nutrition, the eradication of poverty in support of the achievement of the internationally agreed development goals, including the Millennium Development Goals. LINK

QUINOA